The Ring Video Doorbell Pro offers almost everything you'd want in a smart doorbell. It's fairly easy to install, sports a slender design with interchangeable faceplates, and delivers sharp 1080p video day and night. As with the August Doorbell Cam Pro, the Ring Pro uses pre-buffering technology to show you what transpired prior to a motion trigger, and lets you view live video on an id="354749">Amazon Echo Show device using Alexa voice commands.
Even if the power goes out at home, your property will still be protected by the complimentary 24-hour backup battery. And for only $10 a month, you can upgrade to Ring Protect Plus and enjoy 24/7 professional monitoring with cellular backup, unlimited video recording for Ring Doorbells and Cameras at your home. You won’t be locked into any long-term contracts. You don’t need professional installation. You don’t even need any tools. It’s that simple.
Does Alexa work with the Ring Smart Video doorbell? Yes, all Ring doorbells including the Ring 2, Ring Pro & Ring Elite work with alexa. The Ring Cameras like the Ring Spotlight and Ring Floodlight also work with Alexa. We show you how you can connect your Ring smart video doorbell to any Amazon Alexa device that has a screen. We also teach you what the Amazon Alexa can do with the Ring Video doorbell and what it can’t do with the Amazon Alexa. You can also use a Ring Chime or Ring Chime pro as an interior doorbell for any Ring Doorbell device.
Aside from the app and the keypad, there isn’t currently another way to set the system. In comparison, Nest’s system can be set via key fobs, which are quicker and easier than punching in PIN codes or opening an app, or voice through the Google Assistant. Ring says that integration with Alexa will come down the road, but it is not available at this time.
The Ring Pro uses the same Android and iOS mobile app as other Ring devices. It opens to a My Devices screen that has a button for each installed Ring device at the top, as well as a Neighborhood button. Like the Floodlight Cam, the Ring Pro offers a Neighborhood feature that lets you share recorded events with neighbors who have downloaded the Ring app and joined the Neighborhood. You'll receive an alert when a neighbor posts a video, as well as for activities such as fire and police action in your neighborhood.
Below the Live View button is a series of feature buttons. Event History takes you to the same events list that you'll see in the My Devices screen; Device Health lets you check voltage, Wi-Fi signal strength, and system status; Linked Chimes is where you go to pair the doorbell with an external plug-in Ring Chime ($29) or Chime Pro ($49); and Motion Settings lets you adjust motion sensitivity, set up motion zones, and create a motion schedule that determines when motion alerts are active.
This is the first project in Our One Hour Smart Home Project Of The Week Series and we teach you everything you how to wire the Ring Floodlight, and tips to help you set up the Ring Floodlight. We also teach you how you can connect your Ring Floodlight to Amazon Alexa. We cover the smart features of the Ring Floodlight and how it can help you secure your home.
The Ring Alarm system has three different modes, which can be set via the keypad or through the iOS and Android apps. There’s the standard disarmed mode that turns off all of the monitoring; an away mode that watches all of the installed sensors for intrusions; and then a “Home” mode, which by default will monitor sensors installed on entryways, but ignores motion inside the house. I’ve used the latter mode as basically a night or sleep setting, since during the day my family moves in and out of the house a lot and would constantly trip the door sensors.
The Alarm system does not have as many bells and whistles as Nest’s system, nor does it have some of the conveniences Nest provides. But at $199 for the starter bundle, which includes the necessary hub, a keypad, a motion detector, a contact sensor for doors or windows, and a range extender, plus $10 per month for professional monitoring, Ring’s system is significantly cheaper than Nest Secure (which was just recently reduced to $399 for its starter kit) and is one of the least expensive home security systems you can purchase.
The decision to separate the system’s brains—the base station—from the keypad is smart: It allows you to place the larger base station somewhere out of the way and put the smaller keypad near an entry door, where it’s easy to access. You can also deploy more than one keypad—one at the front door, one at the back, and one on your bedside table, for instance. Putting the base station somewhere other than near an entry door also enhances the system’s overall security: If burglars can’t find it quickly, they can’t disable the system.
     I've owned the Ring Video doorbell for about 6 months and it has been a very pleasant experience. It was very easy to install and easy to use. It has never stopped working or had any major issues. This doorbell lets me know when I get packages delivered, when people approach my door, or ring my doorbell. It is very convenient. The only issue I've had is with motion sensitivity. I get a ton of motion notifications from cars on the road, which are about 35 feet away from the doorbell. It seems very accurate with detecting people but it has an issues with cars, especially large vehicles.
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