By default, Ring Alarm offers three modes: Unarmed, Home and Armed, and Away and Armed. You can use the keypad to change modes, or use the mobile app, which also offers access to any Ring cameras you might have set up in your home. The app also provides status updates on any connected devices you have in the house, a separate history log for the alarm system and the cameras,  a settings panel for configuring professional monitoring and what each mode does when activated.
If your existing transformer is 16V or 24V and looks like either of the below with an amperage rating of at least 30VA, your existing transformer is compatible with the Ring Pro Doorbell. You can also click on the image below and it will take you too the two transformers we recommend for the Ring Pro Doorbell that we have tested that we know will work.  If you have really long wiring runs or multiple doorbells you should get the 24V transformer. If your transformer runs are less than 60-80FT and you only have one doorbell the 16V transformer should be enough power. If you are unsure of your existing wiring length you should use the higher voltage 24V transformer for the Ring Pro Doorbell. Not all 24V transformers have a high enough amperage rating to provide enough power to the Ring Doorbell Pro some have a 24V voltage rating but only put out 10VA (amperage) which wont provide enough power to the ring pro doorbell. We have found a 24V transformer on amazon that puts out 40VA (amperage) and is compatible with the ring doorbell pro. Don't deviate and try to get a cheaper 24V option because the other options on amazon don't have enough voltage. Going with the 24V-40VA transformer option below will save you time and headaches down the road if you have a long run of wiring. 
After I finished installing this device I found myself having issues with it for the first 3 days where sensors will go offline for no reason almost every day; suddenly after day 4 maybe, all of the issues disappeared and the system was now working like a well-oiled machine. I reached out to Ring support team and they informed me that there was an automatic update that the brain device was going to perform on its own and that would solve all of the issues I was experiencing. They were indeed 100% correct, after just a few days the system was doing exactly what it was supposed to be doing all along. No issues, no dropped devices, a happy customer here now. If you end up choosing this system and experience issues during the first 3-4 days, please wait a few days for your system to automatically update itself to the latest software and you’ll see the issues magically go away.
Ring is a Wi-Fi connected doorbell and exterior lighting security system that was recently purchased by Amazon. They don’t offer any type of home automation features; however, their system is compatible with many third-party smart home systems. However, Ring has announced that they will soon be adding interior home security and environmental protection features to their current lineup.

In fact, some of my neighbors might testify to this. After Ring sent me the review unit, they also seeded some 20 of my neighbors with Rings of their own. The goal was to turn my neighborhood into something of a test bed for measuring how the doorbell can be deployed to reduce crime (or at least give homeowners more confidence in their own home security). Using the NextDoor social network, I asked neighbors for reviews.
I mentioned a cat sitter. It was kind of awesome to be able to see that she came by every day. In fact, the first day she didn’t come by until 11:00pm and I worriedly texted her to see if she was going to come. Every other day I took solace in knowing that she had already stopped by without having to text her or fear her shed forget. I was able to see when the lawn service came by and did their thing. I was able to see when packages were delivered and when my mom brought the nephews up to use the pool. I also got to scare the crap out of our friend as they were leaving our empty house and I wished them goodnight. That was worth some money right there. I even caught a few people using my driveway to turn around.

Burglars typically start these capers by ringing the doorbell to determine if anyone’s home. The Ring Video Doorbell, thanks to its built-in video camera with two-way communication, directly addresses this nefarious use case by making the bad guys think you’re always at home. There’s also a motion alert feature that let’s you see who’s come to the door, even if they never press the doorbell button.
With the Ring video doorbell and its 180-degree motion detection capability, built-in Wi-Fi, and Ring app compatibility, you’ll get notified via mobile phone alerts when someone steps onto your property. A motion-activated doorbell camera and HD video deliver a crystal-clear picture of who’s at the door, while two-way talk actually lets you communicate with that person in real time. You can give direction to delivery personnel, say hello to your kids from the office, and much, much more. The Ring doorbell is also equipped with infrared night vision and a weather-resistant design, so you’ll rest assured day or night, rain or shine.
By removing the battery, Ring has been able to make the Ring Video Doorbell Pro a bit slimmer and smaller than its first- and second-generation models. The Pro measures 4.5 inches x 1.85 inches x 0.8 inches (11.4 centimeters x 4.7 centimeters x 2.0 centimeters). That’s 6.7 cubic inches (108 cubic centimeters) versus 13.6 cubic inches (223 cubic centimeters) for the Ring Video Doorbell 2—an impressive reduction in volume of more than half.
Ring Alarm hits nearly all the right notes for a basic DIY home security system. I’ve already touched on a couple of its shortcomings—including an absence of support for smart speakers—but tighter integration with Ring’s own cameras would be another welcome development. When an alarm is tripped, the cameras should begin recording to perhaps capture a glimpse of what triggered it—potentially valuable forensic evidence you could provide to the police investigating a break-in. And if Ring Alarm could control your home’s smart lighting, it could turn on all the lights if the alarm is triggered after dark, which might convince an intruder to make a hasty retreat.
Oco Pro Cloud Video Surveillance Camera is easy Oco Pro Cloud Video Surveillance Camera is easy to use HD Wi-Fi camera with Cloud and SD card Recording for monitoring everything you care about: business home children pets elderly parents etc. No Monthly Fees required to access all camera features: Self-learning motion detection system helps Oco understand motion and ...  More + Product Details Close
Most people don't have their wifi routers right near the front door so it can be a challenge getting a strong wifi signal to the Ring Doorbell. The other challenge is that the wifi signal must extend beyond the inside of the house and through building materials like bricks, siding, insulation and wood. So even if you have a strong signal inside your house it doesn't mean that your going to have a strong wifi signal outside your home. 
If it's an entry sensor you're installing, Ring will ask what kind of door it is to apply the right sort of security to it — if it's your front door, for instance, it will use an entry countdown when you open the door while the base station is in Home and armed mode.  If it’s the back door that's opened in this mode, the alarm will sound immediately.

The real failure of this device is its “motion detection”. To illustrate, I’ve attached photos and video. It goes off about every 5 minutes (leaving battery life that lasts 3 days), even for things across the street, even though it’s supposed to have a 5’ range (also attached). The kicker is that it Doesn’t actually catch people coming up to the door. It only shows me coming in our out about 1 in 10 times. I even thought about making a video to show this, but it’s not worth my time for this Piece of junk. Bottom line:
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