I recently purchased the new Ring security system after owning the video doorbell for a while. I bought this system to allow me to ditch my system and service from a large national provider (42$ per month for monitoring vs 10$)! Firstly, I have been interested in this product and company since I saw Jaime Siminoff on Shark Tank back in 2013. Back then the company was called DoorBot. I like the new name much better.
If you do have smart lights and want to control them with a contact sensor or motion detector, you will need to install separate ones in addition to Ring’s, which can make your front door look like it’s grown barnacles with all of the sensors installed. Another simple integration would be to set a smart thermostat to its away mode when the Alarm is set to away, and then switch it back to its home mode when the Alarm is disarmed, but that’s currently not possible either.

To start I shut off the breaker that powers my existing doorbell before removing it and detaching the two wires. I slid off the Ring Pro's detachable faceplate and attached the two wires to the terminals. I then attached the doorbell to the outside of my house using the included mounting screws. I already had a Ring account from previous reviews but if you haven't created one, now's the time to download the app and do so.


While the August doorbell offers a more symmetrical picture with no barrel distortion, it doesn't support IFTTT integration like the Ring Pro does, and Ring's monthly cloud fees are a bit more affordable. As such, the Ring Video Doorbell Pro is an Editors' Choice for smart doorbells. The SkyBell HD is another top pick, and offers features that Ring doesn't, such as color night video, free cloud recording, and compatibility with Nest smart home devices.

The Ring system offers many different types of cameras; which one (or ones) you choose will depend on your unique configuration needs. The Ring Stick Up Cam is a fairly versatile option, letting you monitor both indoor or outdoor areas in 1080p HD video. It can also rest on a flat surface or be mounted to a wall or ceiling. Like the Ring Doorbell, this camera allows two-way talk, so you can see and speak to whoever’s on the other end of the lens using your phone or connected device.
My Wi-Fi problems notwithstanding, both the doorbell and chime accessory were easy to pair with my wireless network. Just a word of caution: If you’re using a Wi-Fi range extender, make sure to pair the doorbell outside your house, right on your doorstep. This will ensure that Ring finds the extender, and not your router. If you pair the doorbell inside your home, you run the risk of pairing it with your main Wi-Fi router, especially if your router and range extender have different names.
The Ring Alarm starter kit is one of the most affordable security systems available. For $200, you get a wireless base station, a keypad for arming and disarming the system, one entry sensor, one motion sensor and a Z-wave range extender. I would have liked the kit to include at least two entry sensors since there's typically more than one point of entry to every dwelling, but you can purchase additional entry sensors for $20 a piece.
Most of my setup time was spent testing the position of the three contact sensors I received. The magnetic sensors consist of two parts. One part goes on a door or window frame, the other part goes opposite it so that when the door or window is opened, the magnetic connection is broken. If the two pieces aren't close enough, roughly half an inch, the sensor doesn't work.

When it's time to pair the keypad, the Ring app will have you create a four-digit PIN for arming and disarming the system. If you choose to have professional monitoring, you'll need to also come up with a verbal password to help identify you in case you have to talk to a dispatcher. As a reviewer — and a person who has tripped  countless alarms in the last few months — I also appreciate that there's a seven-day trial period before professional monitoring becomes active, so you can take time to set up the system without worrying about false alarms. It also gives you time to register the alarm so that you do not incur any fees.


Setting the Ring to away will trigger a customizable countdown timer (from 30 seconds to 3 minutes), to give you time to cancel the alarm or exit the home. It will then push a notification to your phone when the system is armed, as well as announce audibly through the base station and keypad in the home that it has been armed. The system will also push notifications when the alarm is triggered via motion or through an entryway, as well as when it’s disarmed. In my experience, the push notifications were near instant to my device, but I would not want to rely on them in lieu of the professional monitoring, as they would not reach me if my phone had no service or was otherwise inaccessible. The only thing Ring is missing compared to a system from ADT is the ability to detect when a glass windowpane is broken, though it’s worth noting that Nest’s Secure system doesn’t offer this feature either.
When Ring worked as advertised, it delivered on all its promises. I never had any suspicious characters press the button, but I blew my neighbor’s mind when I communicated with her—quite easily, through the doorbell—while I was on vacation in wine country, 80 miles away. Unfortunately, I couldn’t help her get into her house (she had locked herself out), but it was a striking illustration of what Ring can do.
     I've owned the Ring Video doorbell for about 6 months and it has been a very pleasant experience. It was very easy to install and easy to use. It has never stopped working or had any major issues. This doorbell lets me know when I get packages delivered, when people approach my door, or ring my doorbell. It is very convenient. The only issue I've had is with motion sensitivity. I get a ton of motion notifications from cars on the road, which are about 35 feet away from the doorbell. It seems very accurate with detecting people but it has an issues with cars, especially large vehicles.
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