Ring also doesn't currently offer any additional security accessories, but it plans to add a leak sensor and other devices at some point. And while your Ring security cameras and video doorbells ($150 at Amazon) live in the same app as your Ring Alarm Security Kit, there aren't any direct integrations between them today. I'd like to see something like, "If the Ring Alarm Security Kit's front door sensor notices that the door is opened in Home or Away mode, then tell my Ring Video Doorbell Pro to record automatically" -- even if the Video Doorbell Pro itself hasn't detected motion yet. 

Ring offers a wide variety of doorbell and exterior security lighting features that range in price from $99.99 to $499.00, as well as plenty of accessories for them that range in price from $10.00 to $49.00. These accessories include options such as a solar panel, ring chime, quick release battery pack and more. And, they have two monthly video recording packages that range from $3.00 per month ($30 annually) to $10.00 per month ($100 annually).
There is currently no support for controlling the system with voice commands, but it should come as no surprise that Ring is developing an Alexa skill. Once you can arm your security system using a voice command, you won’t want to do it any other way (disarming it that way is whole other question). Harris was slightly more circumspect about supporting Google Assistant. “We remain committed to being open to all of the different pieces that are important to our customers. We’ll continue to march down the path of trying to support everything we can.” I got a similar answer when I asked about support for Apple’s HomeKit technology: “We’ve given it a lot of time. Again, we remain focused on bringing HomeKit support across the product line, but it won’t be available at launch with the Alarm products specifically.”
You’ll need to connect the Pro to a doorbell transformer that supplies 16- to 24 volts of AC power. If your home already has a wired doorbell, it’s probably at this voltage, but you’ll need to check. And not every home has doorbell wiring. If yours doesn’t then you’ll need to install power at your porch (or get an electrician to do it) if you want to use this.
In February 2018 at 2AM Ring came in handy. I received the "Motion Detected" alert on my phone and saw an unknown, adult, male, holding a large black object near his side, walking up my driveway, and towards my front door. The male looked directly at the Ring, stopped, turned around, walked back into the street, got into a vehicle and left. I like to believe Ring deterred this guy from committing a crime. After that moment I remembered I never did an Amazon review for Ring. So here it is. Do yourself and/or family a favor and get the Ring. Peace of mind and makes life easier. SEE ATTACHED PICTURES FOR DETAILS.
I have had a very disappointing experience with my Ring Video Doorbell Pro. When it was installed, I had some customer service issues which were fixed quickly. Then after a few days, the unit continually dropped it's signal and didn't work. I would reboot it, as instructed and repeatedly within 24 hours I would lose the signal again. Finally, the unit lost power completely. Every time I called their customer service, they ran me through the same circus of reboots, despite the fact I told them the battery was drained and although the unit was connected to power, it was not working. I've made 5 calls to their customer service department with long waits on hold and the same scripted 'fix' that has not worked. At this point, I will be returning the doorbell & stick up cam to Amazon for a refund of a defective product that Ring does seem to want to support.
The picture isn’t quite as rosy if you’re also looking for a full-fledged smart home system. Ring Alarm is positively capable of being a great smart home controller. But it’s not that today. And to be fair, Ring isn’t promising that it ever will be—at least not officially. But they wouldn’t have built in Z-Wave, ZigBee, and whatever that third mystery radio is if they didn’t intend to go down that path.
Ring offers a full line of security cameras. These provide more protection and are not limited to just the doorbell area of the home. The security cameras range in overall function and features. The company’s security cameras all come with HD video, which ensures a high quality view every time. They also feature two-way talk features, lights, as well as sirens to alert the area. You can choose to link into them through your app or you can use any pc. Here is a look at some of the options.

Equipment sensor: I have an expensive four-wheeler and zero-turn mower in my backyard, and would like to see some kind of sensor (other than motion, too many plants and wind won’t make it practical) to protect these expensive items as well. This would be a great selling point; maybe like a magnetic plug stuck to a metal part of the bike’s body, that if it’s removed from that metal body it alerts the brain.
The camera's motion sensor worked without a hitch, as did the pre-buffer feature. I always received a push notification, and the camera never failed to record a clip when the sensor was triggered or when the doorbell button was pressed. I created an IFTTT applet to have a D-Link Smart Switch turn on a lamp whenever the doorbell button was pressed, and it worked without fail, as did my Alexa voice command to display the Ring Pro's live stream on my TV using an Amazon Fire TV Stick and Amazon Echo.
The Ring Video Doorbell is battery-operated and Wi-Fi enabled. This HD video doorbell lets homeowners see and speak with visitors from anywhere by streaming live audio and video of a home's front doorstep directly to the free iOS or Android app. Built-in motion sensors detect movement up to 30 Ft. HD video records and stores to the cloud, which can be accessed via the Ring app. Quick and easy to set up, mounts and syncs in minutes and built-in battery, can also be powered through your existing doorbell wires.
But let’s go over what it can do today, first. The very affordable ($199) starter kit includes a wireless base station, a keypad for arming and disarming the system, one door/window sensor, one passive infrared motion sensor, and a Z-Wave range extender. You can monitor the system yourself, but at the price Ring is charging for professional monitoring—just $10 per month ($100 per year if paid annually) with no long-term contract—it would be foolish not to sign up for it. That goes double for people who already have other Ring devices, because it includes video storage in the cloud for an unlimited number of Ring cameras.
Burglars typically start these capers by ringing the doorbell to determine if anyone’s home. The Ring Video Doorbell, thanks to its built-in video camera with two-way communication, directly addresses this nefarious use case by making the bad guys think you’re always at home. There’s also a motion alert feature that let’s you see who’s come to the door, even if they never press the doorbell button.
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